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Hi Gini,

Audible is great. I often listen before I buy. If the book is really good, I buy the print edition. You may want to check your public library too. Ours has audio and digital books we can check out. It helps with that pesky two books per month limit. :)


Did you include "twerking" in your meta tags to get that extra link juice...(just kidding.)

1 year, 1 month ago on Create In-Depth Articles to Increase Your Google Authority

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@ginidietrich

Having different perspectives is a good thing. I’m glad that you were inspired and hope that you can leverage your inspiration into a better future.

My issue is primarily with the disconnect between what is said and what is used as examples. While Sheryl said that we shouldn’t judge the choices others made, there were many things in the book that felt judgmental to me. Our perception is defined by our experiences. The example of women from the Treasury Department sitting along the wall reminded me of personal experiences where women challenged me because they thought I should have handled things differently.

The book doesn’t give us many details about the meeting other than to say the invited guests sat at the table but Secretary Geithner's team chose to sit off to the side. They were there as the Secretary’s staff, not invited guests. We have no idea of the office politics behind their decision. After Sheryl confronted the women about not moving to the table when invited, she said they agreed with her. In summary, the women attended an executive meeting at their boss’ request. They chose to sit away from the table. After the meeting, Sheryl told them that they “should” have moved to the table without knowing why they didn’t. It seems judgmental.

The founder of a firm where I was the first and only female consultant conducted seminars. I always enjoyed accompanying him. He introduced me by saying, “although she looks like she could be a ballerina, she is one of the best engineers I’ve had the privilege to know.” I took his statement as it was meant: a compliment. Women told me at every seminar that I should be offended. I never disagreed with them because they were making judgment calls without knowing the facts. This experience left me asking, “did the women in Sheryl’s example really agree or were they simply trying to move away from an uncomfortable confrontation?”

Starting a dialogue about improving women’s advancement opportunities is wonderful but more is needed. Action has to be taken to change the status quo. Sheryl is in a position to start the process. Seeking a highly qualified individual for an unpaid intern position hardly qualifies as leading the charge. The intern relationship is usually win-win. People get experience that improves their qualifications while the organization gets labor.

Lean In Foundation’s advertisement for an unpaid intern listed qualification requirements above the normal expectations. The ad read, “Wanted: Lean In editorial intern, to work with our editor (me) in New York. Part-time, unpaid, must be HIGHLY organized with editorial and social chops…Design and web skills a plus!” After the ad starting receiving negative feedback, it was deleted and this was posted:

“Want to clarify previous Lean In post. This was MY post, on MY feed, looking for a volunteer to help me in New York. LOTS of nonprofits accept volunteers. This was NOT an official Lean In job posting. Let’s all take a deep breath.” If it isn’t an official Lean In job posting, why does it lead with “Wanted: Lean In editorial intern?” 

The bottom line for me is that I read the book hoping for something to pass on to my daughter. It disappointed me. I remain hopeful that a movement will start that changes the status quo. So far, that has been disappointing too. Hope remains eternal.

1 year, 1 month ago on Lean In: Inspiring, Empowering, and Why You Should Read It

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Hi Gini,

I’m leading with my credentials…I read the book shortly after it was released. It didn’t empower me. It frustrated me. Throughout the book, there seemed to be a condescending undertone that was critical of women that didn’t choose to “lean in” by Sheryl’s standards. She says that women should be able to lead the lives they want while criticizing the way some choose not to “lean in.”

I often joke that I had to go to college to learn that I was short and women couldn’t do anything they wanted. No one mentioned my height or questioned my choices prior to my first year in engineering school. I’ve had the privilege of being the only professional female in a consulting firm (twice), being the COO of Ballard Designs, founding my own firm, AND choosing to downsize so I could spend more time with my children. The path hasn’t been easy but it was my path designed by my choices.

There have been many times that I didn’t “lean in.” Every one was a decision on my part. Given the chance, I wouldn’t change that decision for most of them. The opportunity to become President of a large company was turned down because I wanted the flexibility that came with choosing my workload. My takeaway from Sheryl’s book was that I made the wrong decision AND I let younger women down in doing so.

The statistics were interesting but the book as a whole didn’t deliver what I was seeking. I wanted a book that I could share with my daughter to start a conversation about the real world she’ll enter in a few years. I’ll stick with the practical suggestions in “Why Good Girls Don't Get Ahead... But Gutsy Girls Do” by Kate White.

1 year, 1 month ago on Lean In: Inspiring, Empowering, and Why You Should Read It

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Yes, relationships are even more important than before.

1 year, 2 months ago on Gmail Hosted Email: Will the New Inbox Affect Email Marketing?

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@IpjRobson People will want to get your emails if they provide value but that doesn't mean that the messages will be read in a timely manner. Life is hectic so out of sight is out of mind unless there is an immediate need. The historical advantages of email optimization (like great subject lines) is lost when the messages are hidden in a tab. Marketers have to figure out how to stay in front of their customers.

Thank you for your comment.

1 year, 2 months ago on Gmail Hosted Email: Will the New Inbox Affect Email Marketing?

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@JoeCardilloWell said - "It sure is easier to do email marketing well if you are working with and not against the user. "

1 year, 3 months ago on Gmail Hosted Email: Will the New Inbox Affect Email Marketing?

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@dave_link

Panicking is definitely the wrong move. Marketers need to work on building relationships (which they should do anyway), monitor the effect, and test to find the right solution.

1 year, 3 months ago on Gmail Hosted Email: Will the New Inbox Affect Email Marketing?

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@JoeCardillo Thank you for making an excellent point: "which reflects what they should have been doing for the last 5-8 years anyway." These changes will move marketing to where is should be.

1 year, 3 months ago on Gmail Hosted Email: Will the New Inbox Affect Email Marketing?

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@Howie Goldfarb Thank you Howie. I agree with your choice of an email address over a Facebook like. Email allows companies to economically connect with people on a 1-to-1 basis. The companies that take advantage of this opportunity will improve loyalty and marketing results.

1 year, 3 months ago on Gmail Hosted Email: Will the New Inbox Affect Email Marketing?

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@ryancoxThank you Ryan. MailChimp recently posted some results on open rates before and after the introduction of the tabs. Using around 1.5 billion emails they found that open rates before tabs were consistently above 13%. After the tabs they dropped to around 12.5%. Considering that the tabs are new and people tend to be slow to adapt, this is scary. It's still early so no one should panic but signs are that this will change email marketing forever.

1 year, 3 months ago on Gmail Hosted Email: Will the New Inbox Affect Email Marketing?

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@susancellura I agree completely Susan. The Gmail inbox is designed for users, not marketers. The marketers that work to provide value to people will win the inbox challenge. Good relationships between company and customer have always been important, but they haven't been mandatory until now. If a company had a large enough list, email campaigns would be successful without any focus on relationships. I'm excited about seeing how the great marketers out there use relationship marketing to deliver success.

1 year, 3 months ago on Gmail Hosted Email: Will the New Inbox Affect Email Marketing?

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@PegFitzpatrickI will! I'm in the process of switching from Constant Contact to Aweber so I have a foot in two camps. Constant contact was my tool of choice for years but they are not as social friendly as MailChimp and Aweber. It was hard deciding between Aweber and MailChimp. The interface on Aweber made me decide to go with it.

1 year, 3 months ago on Think BIG

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@PegFitzpatrick The template is really cool. I didn't use the template for this guide because I had most of the stuff already set up. Your talk about how fast everything fell in place makes me want to use it next time. 

Email marketing does rock. It'll be harder with Gmail's new interface but it is still a powerful marketing tool.

1 year, 3 months ago on Think BIG

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Hi Peg! This is great news. APE changed my perspective on writing books. It inspired me to create a new guide designed to help people optimize their email marketing. My favorite part was "Should you write a book?" Please keep me posted on your progress.

1 year, 3 months ago on Think BIG

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@djwaldow Thanks DJ. Sometimes the cost of using licensed characters offsets the return.

2 years, 2 months ago on Would You Open An Email From Don Draper? [Part III]

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Hi DJ,

Did MarketingProfs have to pay AMC to use the Don Draper character for the email? If so, how did the cost affect the ROI?

2 years, 2 months ago on Would You Open An Email From Don Draper? [Part III]

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Wow Margie! This is an incredible list. Thank you for including my post.

2 years, 10 months ago on Margie Clayman’s 100 Favorite Blog Posts of 2011

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Hi Margie,

Social media is a black hole filled with people. Some are real, others are pretending to be real, and still others are evil incarnate. In real life, we can usually distinguish between the good, bad, and ugly because we have all of our senses participating. When we are online, we don't have the same resources. The inability to differentiate between what's real or not combined with the addictive pull of the channel makes it hard to keep from losing yourself.

Take the time you need so that you can come back on your terms. People who are genuine and care about you will be here for you. The rest don't matter. My policy on social media participation is to do what works for me and my community. Period. Once I defined my policy, everything got easier and I stopped falling into the black hole.

My thoughts and prayers are with you. If you need anything, I'm an email or phone call away.

D

2 years, 11 months ago on Social Media is Broken For Me For Now

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@Danny Brown@ginidietrich My BS meter overloaded last week. It's a good thing because the constant beeping was annoying.

3 years ago on The Great Twitter Unfollow of 2011 – Leaked Email

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@FranchiseKing There's no doubt that some people write call out posts to generate traffic and drama. It a proven tactic that has even been recommended by some of the A-list bloggers. Some. Not all. And, having read most, if not all, of Danny's posts, he doesn't fall into the "some" category. While I rarely agree with everything he says (sorry Danny), he has been forthright in the things he shares.

The problem with social media is that it is a new channel. People were placed on pedestals because they amassed thousands of followers . Some who took the cloak of authority grew to fill it with knowledge and insight. Others used it solely to promote their personal brand and improve their financial stability. The first group created a sustainable model. The second, not so much. You can tell the difference between the groups by looking at their activity. The first continue to test and grow. The second spend a lot of time whining about challenges and talking about unproven theories.

There are new people entering the social media world every day. Are we to sit quietly while others provide misinformation and create drama? Or, should we call people out who aren't being forthright? If the goal is to shine a light in the dark corners, I vote for the call out.

3 years ago on The Great Twitter Unfollow of 2011 – Leaked Email

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@keithprivette Thank you Keith. I love social media because it fills the gap between direct marketing and brick-and-mortar by allowing us to connect with our customers.

3 years ago on The Great Twitter Unfollow of 2011 – Leaked Email

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Hi Danny,

Thank you for the chuckle.

Maybe the social media gurus believe the old saying "there's no such thing as bad publicity." Of course @ginidietrich could provide some guidance, but would they listen? I think not.

Maybe we are feeding the monster by talking about it....

Watching the mass unfollow thing was amusing, but there were two things that I found surprising. First, automating the unfollow process is against Twitter's terms of service. How does one automate unfollowing thousands of people without being flagged? It appears that Twitter's TOS only applies to mere mortals.

The second issue was the willingness to blatantly lie. During the mass unfollow, someone asked one of the gurus how many followers were lost by unfollowing so many. He responded that he had gained a few hundred. I couldn't resist checking. According to TwitterCounter, he had lost a few hundred. I tweeted the guru with a screen shot and asked if TwitterCounter was wrong. Not surprisingly, there wasn't a response.

I'm a direct marketer and have been told repeatedly that I don't "get" social media. Maybe not, but I do get this: Social media is an excellent channel for connecting with individual customers on a one to one basis. It allows direct marketers access that was never available in the past. It's a shame that the juvenile and manipulative behavior of a few early adopters taint the channel.

3 years ago on The Great Twitter Unfollow of 2011 – Leaked Email

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@ginidietrich Seriously? Next you are going to tell us that the man behind the curtain is the Wizard of Oz....

3 years ago on Laughable Social Media: The Great Twitter Purge

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How can you engage with authenticity when you don't allow direct messages, share your email address or telephone number, and require people to complete a form to contact you that is prefaced with some form of "I'm busy so you can wait"?

Accessibility is the biggest difference between the "purgers" and great CEO's. Direct contact information, including a physical address, is available for most CEO's. Social media giants? Not. So. Much.

Personally, I don't find people who hide behind the digital curtain engaging or influential. Management of a social media community can be challenging. Unfollowing everyone doesn't improve engagement: it turns the user into a broadcaster. In reality, the purgers have always been broadcasters. Even when they followed everyone and his dog, they rarely responded to any mentions that came from outside their circle. This activity is more obvious now.

If they were true leaders, they would have used the multitude of tools that are available to manage their community. This would have demonstrated an understanding of the channel and how to use it. They chose poorly.

Disclosure: I follow the people who follow me except for obvious spammers and bots. I unfollow inactive accounts and the occasional spammer or bot that gets followed erroneously. The management of my follow/unfollow strategy is a manual process. It takes time, but my community is worth it.

3 years ago on Laughable Social Media: The Great Twitter Purge

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Hi Margie,

Kindness is often equated with weakness. In reality, it is quite the opposite. The ability to kindly respond to hurtful things requires strength. While the ugliness in the online world is disheartening, it is a monster created, in part, by kind people. Clicks are online currency. Every time some one clicks a link to an ugly post or shares the link with his or her community, it rewards the creator. If the blog is monetized, we are literally paying people to be ugly.

Constructive discourse challenging the status quo is necessary for the channel to grow and improve. Personal attacks move us backwards. The current online environment is not conducive to positive growth because people who question the merits of a comment are attacked personally.

@danperezfilms makes an excellent point that some bridges need to be burned. We have to choose our battles carefully and turn the other cheek when it is appropriate. I'm hopeful that over time the people who are using ugliness to further personal causes will be replaced with people who want to work together for a better online community. Until then, I'm trying to do my part by not rewarding them with my clicks or comments.

Nice post! (As in brave, courageous, spot on.)

3 years ago on Being Kind Doesn’t Make Me Stupid

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@prosperitygal@danperezfilms I'm always going for the relationship because trust and sales go hand-in-hand. It's possible to get a test sale (or two as Michele mentioned) without establishing trust but beyond that nothing will happen. My issue is with using the number of comments as an influence metric. The post that typically generate the most comments are all about the drama and not about establishing relationships. They take a lot of time to manage and respond. Business blogs need a return on their investment. If they don't have advertising on their site that generates revenue, how does having tons of comments help their business?

From a consulting standpoint, I have friends in the business whose billables are increasing every month that rarely get a comment on their posts. I also have friends begging for work who receive 50+ comments every post. It's all about the individual relationships, not the public stream of thought.

3 years, 1 month ago on Why Critics of Klout Are Missing the Big Picture

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@danperezfilms True, but creating content that gets comments can be as simple as writing a Klout or controversial post. What about the content that doesn't generate a noticeable reaction in the form of comments, but sends customers and prospects to the company's website to purchase products? The influence of the content is invisible to outsiders and much more powerful because it requires an investment from the participants.

3 years, 1 month ago on Why Critics of Klout Are Missing the Big Picture

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@danperezfilms Hi Dan,

Are you suggesting that influence can be measured by the number of comments?

3 years, 1 month ago on Why Critics of Klout Are Missing the Big Picture

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Hi Jay,

You make an excellent argument when comparing Klout to other tools that provide numerical justification with creative math. The noise surrounding Klout's validity is too loud. My issue with Klout isn't with the accuracy of their reporting. The problem is with the companies that are using this tool to spread their message instead of providing the level of service required to get influence organically. If they would invest in providing a quality customer experience and encourage their customers to share the information with friends and family, they wouldn't need artificial influence.

3 years, 1 month ago on Why Critics of Klout Are Missing the Big Picture

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Congratulations Gini.

3 years, 1 month ago on We Interrupt Your Regularly Scheduled Programming

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Danny,

This is my new favorite post from you. Morton's responding to Peter's tweet is a great PR move if quality is measured by the amount of free publicity. It is also great service...for Peter. Unfortunately, it is not a brilliant business move because it creates expectations for a service level that is not sustainable. The logistics and costs associated with a delivery service are quite challenging.

If they are not offering a delivery option to everyone, it is not great service (as you noted.) It isn't great PR either because great PR improves a brand's reputation. It doesn't mislead people and create false expectations.

3 years, 2 months ago on Great Customer Service or Great PR?

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Managing customers' expectations is the key to not being online 24/7. If people know that you are monitoring their messages and will respond in a given time, issues are rare. But, if your responses are inconsistent and appear day and night, missing some creates problems. Creating a FAQ page that specifies when you are online and following your guidelines solves the 24/7 problem.

As @allenkristina noted, the need varies by industry. Businesses known for 24/7 service need to provide it online as well. The challenge for most is that their social presence is managed by a normal business hours marketing group instead of the 24/7 customer care team. If companies segmented their participation by having marketing do the marketing posts and customer care responding to the customers, it would eliminate the challenge.

3 years, 3 months ago on The Fallacy of Round the Clock Social Media

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@ginidietrich there is also the added bonus of being able to customize (aka brand) your WordPress blog. It's nice being able to control it all with a little coding knowledge.

3 years, 4 months ago on Thinking About Moving to Tumblr? Don't.

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Jumping into a ready made community is tempting, but I'll stay with WordPress. Since my blog uses Wordpress.org, it is self-hosted. If WordPress goes away tomorrow, it won't take my community with it. There are advantages and disadvantages in both homegrown and borrowed communities. They should be evaluated carefully before deciding where to place your content.

Tumblr is a great option for starting bloggers or people without the technical skills to self-host. Deciding what is best for your blog is a personal decision, but I wonder how many people choose "easy" without thinking about the long term ramifications. Social media platforms and tools are new and risky. They may be the hottest property today and gone tomorrow. Anyone who chooses to park their content in a space he or she doesn't own would be wise to back it up daily. Then, if the worst case scenario happens, transitioning to another platform will be much easier.

3 years, 4 months ago on Thinking About Moving to Tumblr? Don't.

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@ginidietrich Sometimes the work isn't as hard as people think. If a company has a solid internal benchmarking program, the effect of PR is much easier to measure. If customer service reps are encouraged to ask "how did you hear about us?" when taking orders and specific PR efforts are coded, measurement is easier. It can be as simple as working with other departments to find the best way to measure cause and effect. Perhaps this is where the work is the hardest. Crossing department lines can be really challenging.

3 years, 4 months ago on The Communication Industry Has a Perception Issue

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Direct marketers are all too familiar with this issue. There is always a shuckster stealing the media's attention away from the businesses and people who provide quality service to their customers every day. In all honesty, it's a little nice having the attention focused on other industries for a change.

Gini, your points about measuring and showing value are spot on. If people focused on the added value instead of the drama, there would be a quick turnaround. Adding a post mortem stage after every PR project that includes metrics and a this worked, that didn't summary would change perceptions and provide stepping stones to better results.

3 years, 4 months ago on The Communication Industry Has a Perception Issue

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Thank you, Gini!

3 years, 4 months ago on Three Premium eBooks

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Gini,

Reading your post sent me back to my college days when I had a similar experience. My caller loved to tell me what time my curtains closed and describe the visitors to my apartment. A similar, polite "nothing we can do until he harms you" response came every time I called the police. My stalker was stopped when he tried to flash me as a police car was passing by I consider this proof positive that God has a sense of humor. The policeman was one who had told me nothing could be done. The stalker was arrested and convicted as a flasher. Nothing was done about the stalking. Thank you for sharing your story.

3 years, 4 months ago on Help Change the Laws On Stalking

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Hi Mack,

This is thought provoking for the people who have tons of followers. I choose to follow people so they can reach out to me via direct messages. The people with a community of thousands are the exception instead of the rule according to twittercounter. 82% of Twitter users have less than 350 followers (http://thenextweb.com/socialmedia/2010/09/30/twitter-statistics-82-of-twitter-users-have-less-than-350-followers/).

It has been said that no one can maintain relationships with more than 150 people. I don't know if this is true, but I find that my Twitter relationships are cyclical. A few people chat with me almost every day. Most are friend in real life. Our conversations are multichannel, switching between email and Twitter. (Which always generates DM's and emails asking what we are talking about.)

There are others who chat with me about a specific topic, then disappear for a while. Our conversations are good and often insightful, but they are not ongoing. I like seeing them in my stream so I can see what they are saying. For now, I'll keep following and hope that people continue to follow me. If there is a snapback (and there very well may be), I'll rethink my strategy.

3 years, 5 months ago on Are we headed toward a Social Media snapback?

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@MackCollier There is a demand no doubt and I have no issue with people monetizing social media. Using blogchat as an example, I think that it is terrific that you are able to generate revenue from the live events. You should be compensated for the time and effort that you put into the chat.

Selling the transcripts is different. The information shared is creative content that belongs to the people who create the tweet. If selling transcripts is acceptable, why stop there? Why not create an e-book of the best blogchat tips? Or, compile a selection of the funniest tweets from blogchat for a coffee table book? The question is who has the right to sell tweet that originated from others? Does tweeting require you to give up all rights to the content you created?

For me, this isn't a question of whether social media should be monetized or not. I think it should generate an income for the people creating content and building communities. It is a question of who owns the content that is created and has the right to monetize it in any form.

3 years, 5 months ago on A huge social media money-making opportunity in Twitter chat transcripts

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@kristofcreative Agreed! Instead of content vs service, maybe the question is "are people willing to freely share quality content if they know it is going to be leveraged for someone else's profit?" I'm one that will walk away from chats when transcripts start being sold.

3 years, 5 months ago on A huge social media money-making opportunity in Twitter chat transcripts

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@kristofcreative Compiling information for easy consumption isn't new. Books have had summarized versions available forever. The same argument can be made that people are paying for the service instead of the content, but there is a difference - the original authors receive a residual for the use of their work. And, if the content isn't the objective, why do people need the service?

3 years, 5 months ago on A huge social media money-making opportunity in Twitter chat transcripts

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Hi Mack,

Many of the people who participate in blogchat are consultants who make a living from their knowledge. Every week they log into Twitter and freely share information with others. Since Twitter is a microblogging site, turning their tweets into "a huge social media money making opportunity" is akin to selling information that was mined from their blogs.

Like many things in this world, what can be done isn't always what should be done. Since the copyright laws are behind the technology and it can be repackaged as selling the "technology" instead of the content, one could do it. But at what price? How many of your loyal participants will stop sharing once their tweets are being compiled and sold? Will the candor be the same? Or, will people hold back on their best ideas because they don't want to contribute to the profit machine without receiving compensation?

As a direct marketer and social media advocate, I'm all for combining the two into a profitable enterprise when ownership of the content is clearly defined. But, when a community comes together to share and help each other grow, turning the conversations into a profit center just feels wrong.

3 years, 5 months ago on A huge social media money-making opportunity in Twitter chat transcripts

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@MackCollier @loisgeller @TomPick @HeidiCohen@brucesallan

Hi Mack,

Great idea! I'm in and happy to review blogs. Please email me with the ones you want me to review so I can prepare.

3 years, 5 months ago on Get your blog reviewed during #Blogchat!

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@Lisa Gerber Lisa, would you please create one so I can sign up?

3 years, 5 months ago on Peer Index vs. Klout

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Hi Gini,

The measurement of social media influence by any tool is misleading. The only data available to the tools is the information provided in bios and the activity surrounding the account. People who are unemployed (or under employed) and actively participating are weighted higher than actual influencers who are busily making a difference. Given the time and inclination, it is easy to game the numbers. Who does it help? And, how? I would much rather have a tool where I could search for people who share a common interest. In my perfect world, the tool would look beyond the bio to find a match. It would review the content for a definable period of time and provide a match rating.

Using your example of "Tree Frogs Singapore", the results would look like this:

There are 1917 accounts that have mentions of "tree frogs Singapore" in the last 30 days. Here is a list of them with their match rating:

TFS178 98%

TFS236 62%

and so on. This would allow us to quickly see if people interested in tree frogs from Singapore are actively participating in social media and provide a way for us to connect with them. Odds are none of them will every be influential as defined by the tools that currently exist.

Which leads me to this question: If social media is supposed to be a channel where like minds can connect, why do the platforms make it so hard to find each other?

3 years, 5 months ago on Peer Index vs. Klout

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Gini,

I'm glad you decided to post. Using the tweet (campaign???) as a teaching opportunity is helpful. (As compared to all of the Kenneth Cole you're @#$% commentary out there.)

We need more teaching, less ugliness.

Thank you.

3 years, 8 months ago on Kenneth Cole Demonstrates How Not to Use Twitter

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@charityestrella
Hi Charity,

Things get distorted at times because people tend to base their views on their experiences. I agree that no one can provide a specific how-to manual for individual businesses because the dynamics are so different from company to company. As a proponent of testing everything, I think that it is great that Chris is trying new things and sharing the experience. The issue I have with his post is two-fold and has nothing to do with ROI.

First, once given leadership status by a community, what responsibility does the person have to his or her followers? I agree with your point that everyone should use judgment when considering new tactics, but that simply doesn't happen. There will always people who try everything suggested by the people they view as leaders. Chris has established himself as a leader. Shouldn't he be trusted (or expected) to provide qualifiers? At what point does saying, "Hey, published authors looking for more readers: Want to have some fun? Use FourSquare and Twitter to make a few potential new relationships happen," without noting that some might find it invasive become reckless? There's no "test this to see if works" or "this might work for you" qualifiers within the post.

Second, the marketing strategy Chris recommends in his blog and speeches is one that finds people seeking your products or services and provides them with more information to make a better buying decision. His recommended approach for authors skipped the search for people seeking books about specific topics and went for people who the "book would make sense to them." This moves it from one type of marketing to the other as mentioned in his "Two Sides of Marketing" post. The "Bigger Ear Marketing for Authors" post is inconsistent with the messages he's been posting for years.

Maybe some of the distortion you see is due to people trying to process the shift from engaging a community to targeting people based on location and profile.

3 years, 9 months ago on Why Brogan’s Bigger Ear Marketing Is Wrong

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@bdorman264 You bring up a good point about being a novice. The new people joining Twitter in droves aren't aware of the tools and tactics. Calling people out for not knowing how to do things diminishes the sense of community and belonging. It's much better to offer assistance.

If someone is new to the social media world and taking Foursquare for a trial spin receives a marketing message noting their location, I guarantee that the creepy factor just got multiplied.

3 years, 9 months ago on Why Brogan’s Bigger Ear Marketing Is Wrong

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@DenVan Excellent formula!

3 years, 9 months ago on Why Brogan’s Bigger Ear Marketing Is Wrong

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