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So many comments, so many cars, almost none of them viable.  Especially at the price points demanded. 

What I want is a small, fun 4-door with excellent handling and a nice sounding engine (it doesn't need to be powerful) for $20,000.  It does not need to emulate anything from the past, it doesn't have to have a particular drive train.  It just needs to be fun, not horrifically over-styled (which probably makes it unobtanium) and built properly with bullet-proof reliablility.  I realize all of this in one car is just about impossible. 

11 months, 4 weeks ago on Discussion: Which Car Should Be Brought Back?

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@ryukyustriker It's also been a blessing from heaven for Australia and New Zealand as it's allowed them access to many, many great cars at reasonable prices.  I can believe the GTR price though, as the R32 Skyline GT-R is the 5.0 Fox-body Mustang of Japan.  Very, very cheap performance for the yen...

1 year ago on Only in Japan: A Carspotting Story

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@roryfjohnston The only thing I would add is that please don't just form your ideas of Japan, or Japanese car culture from magazines or Speedhunters or anything else.  Like most countries with serious petrolhead communities, there is much more variety and nuance than it is possible for media of any kind to capture.  And like everywhere else, it can translate awkwardly.  The stuff that those of us outside Japanese culture looking in find fascinating are not the same things which have the most revence in Japan. 

For all the 1000hp Skylines and the like, while the Wangan might let someone stretch those things out, it doesn't square with 2 meter wide touge with a 40km/h speed limit and on-coming traffic.  With conditions like that, the sensation matters as much as the numbers, which is why much of Japanese car culture goes in the directions which it does.

Also, the car culture mixes with contemporary culture in odd ways.  Everyone loves Studio Ghibli movies.  What isn't as known is that hayao Miyazaki is a massive gear head, and that's why all the cars in his movies are so well-drawn in comparison with some of the rest of the artwork...

1 year ago on Only in Japan: A Carspotting Story

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@Mike Garrett You should try and pitch a Speedhunters Japan road trip.  Say, Toyama to Shimonoseki along the coast of the Sea of Japan, or Kagoshima to Fukuoka over Mt. Aso.  Definitely a view that would be a bit different.

1 year ago on Only in Japan: A Carspotting Story

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It would be nice to see some stuff of places outside Tokyo and Osaka.  I realize that between Kanto and Kansai you've essentially got 50% of the population covered, but going out to the 'less fashionable' areas up north/east and west/south can be significantly more odd ball.  There's less money, so less of the high-end, but you can see more of what people do with limited resources, which is generally more creative. 

Also, the food is much better...

1 year ago on Only in Japan: A Carspotting Story

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 @Larry Chen

 Why?  Was there a technical problem, quality of equipment issue, or poor implementation?  I ask this in all honesty as the data is definitely measurable.  The hard part might be working out the formulas to accurately score things, but there is no way these things can't be measured...

1 year ago on Formula D Texas: The Monster Qualifier Is Back

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Given the modern technology packed into a cellphone, I really can't see a reason for professional-level drifting to be a judged competition.  Between GPS, some cheap accelerometers, and data-logging which can measure steering input/angle and wheelspin, it would not be too hard to work out a mathematical model to score the runs without human judges, which would get rid of the silly arguing once and for all.  Until they do, I can't really bothered to watch, as I don't feel judged competitions are sufficiently sporting enough to be entertaining.  Too much human bias.

1 year ago on Formula D Texas: The Monster Qualifier Is Back

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Agreed.  This list reads as if the main criteria was how much the car influenced the RWB aesthetic.

1 year ago on Poll: The Greatest 911 Race Car?

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I have to agree with some of the other comments, this is a very poor list.  It seems that you guys were trying to pick specific cars, rather than models, but even so, the preponderance of Group 5 silhouettes lacks historical depth.  No mention of any of the 3.0 RSRs that won at the Targa Florio, Daytona or Sebring in the early 1970s?  These were naturally-aspirated GT cars beating the prototyes.  Not turbo-charged silhouettes like the 935 that were equal (at least) to the early GTPs, but actual GT cars.  Or the 996 GT3-RS that did the same at Daytona in 2003?  Giant-killing is at the core of the Porsche motorsports story, and by only telling the stories of cars which fit the big wings and fender flares aesthetic you miss out on much of the 911's story and do your readers a dis-service.

1 year ago on Poll: The Greatest 911 Race Car?

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As much as I think I get it, Liberty Walk just doesn't work for me. I'm glad they're in business (anyone making an honest living from customizing Lambos should be celebrated); but I'll take mine stock, in a dark matte blue. With Matt Monro on the stereo.

1 year, 7 months ago on Liberty Walk + A Vent + A Door = Insanity

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