Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

What a good idea!!! I raise chickens and had never thought of using the shells for calcium for ME! If I'm ambitious, I crush and feed the eggs back to the hens. I also supplement with generous amounts oyster shells. But because the shell is mostly packaging, it seems like I'm feeding oyster shells to manufacture a natural box or jar or container for the eggs, one which is immediately discarded afterwards. Also, I was wondering if there might be significant micronutrients in some egg shells compared to calcium tablets, especially in hens that are free ranging and eating a wide variety of natural, foraged foods. I'm going to try it.

A related story is the time my not-too-bright-but-much-loved dachshund ate an entire carton of eggs: a dozen eggs, all the shells, AND the cardboard carton. The sharp egg shells really tore his insides up and he was really sick. But he'd do it again given the chance!

8 months ago on Eating Eggshells for Calcium?

Reply

@BethTerry People have been camping without plastic for a long time but I can see your point. I suspect that camping on the playa during or after a rainstorm might not be something that our pre-plastic ancestors did! We did camp in a lot of questionable places (you don't get to pick the "best spot" when reenacting) and we camped all over the rainy Northwest, but we never camped on a playa!  

1 year ago on Plastic-Free Burning Man -- The List, Part 1

Reply

@BethTerry @Laurie E It really wasn't an issue. The tent canvas repelled the water and ran down the sides and, if the tent were placed correctly (not in a depression where rain gathered), the water drained away from the tent. The only time rain was an issue was setting up camp AFTER a heavy rainstorm. Rain wasn't an issue. Damp ground wasn't an issue. But soggy mud and puddles were a problem. Of course, they're also a problem with a nylon tent, just not as much so. But normally, a rainstorm was a fun event! Once the tent was in place, the ground underneath stayed dry.

1 year ago on Plastic-Free Burning Man -- The List, Part 1

Reply

I really like your post. Your (mostly) plastic-free tent reminded me of the years we did Civil War reenacting and the wonderful canvas Sibley tent we used for our family. (There is an extensive network of cottage industries that cater to reenactors and produce plastic free reproductions. That's where we got the tent.) The Sibley tent lasted years, much longer than our reenacting experience. We took it camping all the time. The kids even had sleepovers in it with their friends in the backyard. It got heavy use. And it was fun. And unlike a plastic or nylon tent, when it tore we could patch it. It was the most comfortable tent we've ever owned, cool in the heat and warm in the cold. It held up in strong winds and rain. The only downside was there was no floor but we learned to adapt and used rugs and old quilts, and I actually liked that better because it was easier to clean afterwards because the "floor" came apart easily for cleaning. And it had a tall center pole that fit under all the seats of our van but might be a problem now that we have a smaller car. Great tent. Great fun!

1 year ago on Plastic-Free Burning Man -- The List, Part 1

Reply

I usually take all my styrafoam peanuts, bubble wrap, and packing materials to the local mailing store but I also recycle some of the bubble wrap as "poor man's dual pane windows". I live in an older house with single pane windows and you can feel the cold coming through the glass. Spray the window with plain water, position the bubblewrap to the window (bubble side towards the glass) cutting the bubblewrap pieces to fit the window. It will "stick" through contact with the water and will stay for months or years. It's amazing! The windows let in light but of course, you can't see out so I usually use the bubblewrap in the bedrooms and bathrooms where it's cold and an outside view isn't so important and where lace curtains hide the plastic (although it really doesn't look as bad as you'd imagine if you apply it carefully). I learned about this technique in a permaculture class on greenhouses and adapted the idea to a residential home. And of course, when you remove the bubble wrap in spring, you can still take it a mailing store if you want. It probably uses less plastic than all the styrafoam and packaging that come with new windows, which of course isn't in my budget right now, plus it always arrives in the cold of the winter, just when those back bedrooms get chilly! And it's free.

1 year, 8 months ago on What to Do with All That Holiday Plastic

Reply